seizure???

Discussion in 'Sporting Dog Training' started by Lucky13, Jun 20, 2005.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Member

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    <P style="MARGIN: 0px">My Lab was doing some retrieving last Friday and on a retrieve&nbsp; and he dropped like a sack of potatoes.&nbsp; He was slow to get up and when he did he was dragging his rear legs.&nbsp; He fell down again and tensed up and his back legs started to go into a "spasm".&nbsp; My neighbors stayed w/ him while I ran in and called the vet.&nbsp; By the time I got back out he was acting normal again like nothing had happened.&nbsp; We went to the vet and they said that this is pretty normal and see this same thing very frequently.&nbsp; They called it an "event".</P> <P style="MARGIN: 0px">&nbsp;</P> <P style="MARGIN: 0px">They said that they don't start to worry about it until it happens several times.&nbsp; They did not run any tests.</P> <P style="MARGIN: 0px">&nbsp;</P> <P style="MARGIN: 0px">Has this happened to anyone else??</P>
     
  2. sbe023

    sbe023 New Member

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    <P>my lab had 1 a few weeks ago. the vet said all we could do is to watch for more. he may need doggy downers for the rest of his life if they keep recurring. also heard many other ideas about ,using carpet fresh and other household items around him and possibly even something he ate.(hot dog maybe). search the site for the list of the replies i recieved . it was a good read and thanx to the guys for posting. he hasn't had 1 since the first.ptolly 6 weeks ago. if he has more document the incident for your vet to go over.</P>
     

  3. MaktheQwk

    MaktheQwk Well-Known Member

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    <P>I had a Golden at one time that&nbsp; became very prone&nbsp; to episodes of seizure. My vet placed him on a maintenance regimen of Phenobarbital, and he lived quite the normal life after that. I think of him every time I see Capt. Mark run his avatar of his goldie. If you have a good relationship with your current vet&nbsp;, you should be able to trust his diagnosis.</P>
     
  4. Trainer

    Trainer New Member

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    <P>Another thing that will cause one of these episodes is an insect bite or bee sting.&nbsp; Had this happen two times over the years.&nbsp; Jim</P>
     
  5. Orion

    Orion New Member

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    Are you sure it wasn't heat stroke?&nbsp; Everyone: please be careful when working dogs in warm weather.&nbsp; I have posted this before, but here it is again:<br> <font face="Verdana" size="2"><br> Hot weather presents some risks that must be properly managed for the safety and health of your working dog.&nbsp; Dogs do not perspire like humans, instead, they shed excess heat through panting.&nbsp; Cooling occurs by evaporation of the dog’s saliva from its tongue.&nbsp; Hard work, heat, humidity, poor conditioning and stress are major contributors to heat build-up in a dog.<br> <br> Handlers can reduce the amount of heat their dog produces by keeping sessions very short and giving the dog plenty of time to rest and cool off between running.&nbsp; Some simple preventative measures you can take are: Have plenty of cool water for your dog to drink.&nbsp; Get your dog in the water whenever possible.&nbsp; Use fans to move air in your dog’s wire crate when he is not working.&nbsp; Keep your dog in a shady area when resting. Keep a thermometer in your dog’s crate.<br> <br> You can take a digital thermometer along in the field and monitor the dog’s temperature frequently.&nbsp; Normal canine body temperature is 101.5 to 102.5 degrees.<br> <br> Signs of heat stress are: red, widened tongue, elevated body temperature, dog wants to lay down.<br> <br> If you need to cool your dog in a hurry, it is wise to carry some rubbing alcohol and some chemical ice packs in your first aid kit (you do have one, don’t you?).<br> <br> To make the alcohol go farther, put it in a squirt or spray bottle.&nbsp; Apply alcohol or ice packs to the following areas;&nbsp;&nbsp; back of the head, jugular veins, groin, arm pits, under side of the ear flaps, and foot pads.<br> <br> When using any cooling technique, you need to stop BEFORE the dog's body temperature gets all the way back to normal, or the dog will get hypothermia and go into shock.<br> <br> Signs of heat stroke are:<br> Rapid noisy breathing, wobbling gait, stumbling, vomiting, dog on the ground and unable to get up, and body temperature between 104 to 107 degrees. After treating your dog for any of these symptoms, make sure you get it to a vet as soon as possible.</font>
     
  6. MaktheQwk

    MaktheQwk Well-Known Member

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    <P>Jim, your reply made me think about another of my&nbsp; canine companions, since gone. I was cutting the grass one day, several years ago, and my wife pulled in the driveway as she came home from work. The first words out of her mouth were, "What's wrong with the dog?" I went over to my brittany, Buster, and found him seizing. His muzzle was clenched shut, he was salivating profusely,eyes rolling back in his head,&nbsp;and his gums and internal flesh of his cheeks and jowls were an absolute ashen grey. I gathered him up, tossed him in my Suburban, and headed for our vet, who luckily is only 10 minutes away. As I backed out of the drive, I instructed my wife,Sue, to call the vets office and tell his receptionist I was on my way in with a potential medical emergency. By the time I got to the vets, he was almost completley out of his deleriom. My vet saw him, and confirmed that the symptoms I described were classic symptoms of anyphylactic shock, usually induced by some type of bee sting or insect bite. He gave my Britt a steroid shot, and by the time we got back home, you would have sworn NOTHING had occured to him to have induced such a panic attack in me and my wife!! Those who have dabbled in the pointing breeds have more than likely watched young pointing pups stalk and point bees on clover plants or flowers in the yard!!</P>