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1 more pass? No Way!
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Some guys go with muratic acid and self etching primer before paint.
 

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If it's unpainted already the metal needs to be cleaned well and the best primer is a self etching epoxy primer made for aluminum. The most durable top coat would be a 2 part polyurethane.
 

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Make sure that you apply as thin as possible and let each coat dry completely. I like Lock Stock and Barrel FME
 

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Are you stripping to bare metal?
Zinc chromate is supposed to be about as good as it gets for aluminum primer. But it's THIN, so you have to spray a couple lite coats. And it's pretty mean stuff so precautions need to be taken
After that, you can paint with whatever you like.
I tried a couple different products/ways before I restripped and went with it.
I also only found it in rattle cans.
 

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If it has paint already on it, I wouldn't strip it down to bare metal, unless if is already coming up. If it's solid, it may already have a good primer.
 

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I have painted two (2) aluminum marsh boats and a canoe with good success. The key is in the preparation if its going to last. This process works for previously painted metal surfaces and/or bear metal.

Wash it with trisodium phosphate (TSP) based soap and water. Once dried, either use 150 grit sand paper or scotch pads to rough the entire surface to be painted. Then wash it well again with TSP based soap and water and let it dry. Then wipe it down with a rag lightly soaked with either acetone or MEK in a well ventilated area to remove any residual materials like grease or oil. Don't use turpentine or paint thinner as these leave a residue. Wear chemical resistant gloves and keep flames or sparks away from the area is these are extremely flammable.

At this point you must not touch the boat with your bare hands as it will leave oil from your skin and affect paint adherence at the contact points. I wear non-powdered surgical gloves from here on out when I touch the boat.

Prime the entire surface with Sherwin Williams DTM primer (brush application). Do this in a shaded area to avoid direct sunlight while the primer initially dries. After 2 days drying in the shade, I place the boat out in the direct sun to let the primer bake on avoiding any rain or accumulation of surface moisture. I never leave it outside at night so that moisture won't condense on the surface. After at least 2 days of sun, apply the top coat of your choice. I had good success with Hunter's Specialty paint (brush on). Typically used 2 light coats. Allow each top coat to intially dry in the shade and then bake in the sun for few days.

Word of caution, don't expect the paint to wear like iron. The two (2) boats and a canoe that I have painted have been in use for over 6 years with paint wear only at typical wear and contact points. I also use this process to camo my SS thermos or anything else metal (excepting my firearms... LoL) that I use in the marsh. Good luck!
 

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I am pretty sure that the most durable paints for use on metal as used on commercial trucks, aircraft, water craft are 2 part polyurethanes.
Most are made for spraying and must be used with caution, I think there are some made for brush and roller special made for boats.
Most are high gloss though there might be a flattening additive available.
2 part paints develop a stronger molecular bond.
 
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