rigging decoys for deep water

Discussion in 'Beginners Corner' started by Bray34, May 24, 2009.

  1. Bray34

    Bray34 New Member

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    <P>im new to duck hunting and was wondering how to rig my decoys if i hunt from a boat this season in deep water any advice???&nbsp;</P>
     
  2. Casey

    Casey New Member

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    One option is to run long lines.&nbsp; I think that Doctori lines is a sponsor and has quality stuff.&nbsp; <br><br>Another option is to use reels.&nbsp; I've seen them, but don't have any info on them.<br><br>Check the classified ads.&nbsp; I think that Ducksdemise had a whole set of long lines available.&nbsp; If they are not for sale, maybe the add is still up, and you can get a better idea of what is needed.<br>
     

  3. lefercor

    lefercor New Member

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    <P>How deep of water you talking about?&nbsp; Be care full out there...deep water hunting is not for rookies, very dangerous.</P>
     
  4. Bray34

    Bray34 New Member

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    <P>the ohio river just new to duck hunting and hunt with veterns!!!!!!!!!!!plus not new to boating in cold weather but thanks for the concern.....i think that im going to just gang rig them</P>
     
  5. SUPERFOWLER

    SUPERFOWLER New Member

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    <P>best advice I can give for hunting the river is to find a spot that's shallow that you can wade.&nbsp; I hunt the river often and have found several spots that has a hard bottom and you can wade out about 50yards before it drops off.&nbsp; That's the best way to go on the Ohio in my opinion.&nbsp; Even the couple spots we've hunted that was not wadable we'd at max be in 15' of water but setting/picking up in the current from a boat is kind of difficult if the waters moving much.&nbsp; I hunt eastfork a lot too and it's about 30' deep right off the bank, that sucks winding 3 or 4 dozen lines up when you're in that deep of water but that's the name of the game there.&nbsp; I'm trying to devise a way to use a decoy spreader type system for EF where you can attach 3 or 4 dekes to one anchor thus making setting up/picking up much less time consuming.&nbsp; My buddy from missouri that hunts timber and rice says if he had to mess with 30' lines he wouldn't hunt..hahaha</P>
     
  6. fiberduck

    fiberduck New Member

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    Those are the key questions - is the deep water a lake, a reservoir or a river - and that will challenge your set up options.&nbsp; I've tried several and combinations of each.<br><br>On a river you have to consider the current.&nbsp; Individual lines on a decoy will need heavier weights else the current will drag them away.&nbsp; There's nothing worse then getting a spread set, the sun comes up and you see everything has shifted downstream on you.&nbsp; I agree with Superfowler, find an eddy or backwater and you'll be able to manage the depth with individual lines on your decoys not to mention avoiding having a tree float thru your spread and taking it away or your having to push the boat out thru your spread to chase your dog and a downed bird being carried away.<br><br>On a smaller river or where the current isn't so strong I've used "short" long lines - a dozen or so decoys on multiple lines each with a heavy weight - this displays a nice swimming group of ducks.&nbsp; Be careful with a dog though, on a river the lines are stretched out and a pup can get tangled up in them if he swims thru them.&nbsp; I attach a smaller weight on the long line where the decoy's drop line attaches to address this.&nbsp; Other than that you're back to heavier weights and a lot of string on each decoy.<br><br>On a reservoir if it is deep water you won't have a current or a dependable wind to keep a long line rig stretched out.&nbsp; I've tried it, even anchoring both ends and it is a hassle - time consuming, tangles, resetting, etc.&nbsp; I'm back to long strings on each decoy.<br><br>Either way a key challenge setting decoys with a boat is keeping the decoy lines out of your prop.&nbsp; Current, wind and the shoreline will present different situations that dictate setting up starting upstream and working your way downstream, starting in close to shore and working your way out, etc.&nbsp; Sometimes your best bet is to pitch the decoys out from shore then picking them up with the boat after the hunt.<br><br>It really, really, really sucks when you tangle up your decoys around your prop, in the dark, you're drift away downstream and you're scrambling to beach the boat with a push pole or standing on the back of the boat leaning over your motor cutting them away.<br>